Guide for the management, analysis, and interpretation of occupational mortality data
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Guide for the management, analysis, and interpretation of occupational mortality data

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers of Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in [Atlanta, Ga.?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Occupational mortality -- United States -- Statistical services -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementNina Lalich ... [et al.].
SeriesDHHS (NIOSH) publication -- no. 90-115
ContributionsLalich, Nina., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC963.3 .G85 1990
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 82 p. ;
Number of Pages82
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20801536M

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Get this from a library! A Guide for the management, analysis, and interpretation of occupational mortality data. [Nina Lalich;]. National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.) ". This handbook is prepared by the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Public Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services, and contains instructions for funeral directors1 for completing the occupation and industry items on the death certificate. An Epidemiologic Study Of Mortality And Radiation-Related Risk Of Cancer Among Workers At The Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory, A U.S. Department Of Energy Facility: NIOSH Occupational Energy Research Program Final Report. A Guide for the Management, Analysis, and Interpretation of Occupational Mortality Data. U.S. Department of Human Health Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. , (September ). Provides guidelines for state health departments interested in occupational mortality surveillance.

Conception and design of the study, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; Drafting of the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content, and; Final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet all conditions. One author should be chosen to act as a corresponding author. GUIDELINES FOR STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE DATA FINAL by IT Environmental Programs, Inc. Chester Road Cincinnati, Ohio and ICF Kaiser Incorporated Lee Highway Fairfax, Virginia Contract No. D Work Assignment No. for OFFICE OF POLLUTION PREVENTION AND TOXICS U.S. . This Study Guide consists of approximately 22 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Mortality. This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion on Mortality by Christopher Hitchens. "Mortality. Occupational safety and health is an area concerned with protecting the safety, health and welfare of people engaged in work or employment. The goals of occupational .

The overwhelming majority of statistical analyses of occupational cohort data are conducted in terms of the standardized mortality ratio or SMR. Saracci and Johnson () reviewed 55 cancer epidemiology papers published during in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the British Journal of Industrial Medicine and the Journal of Cited by: 5. Includes 12 chapters on data collection, management, analysis, dissemination; human subjects issues; and program evaluation. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS): Methodology Describes the methodology of PRAMS, examines recent response rates, determines characteristics associated with response, and tracks response patterns over time. A Practical Guide to Dose-Response Analyses and Risk Assessment in Occupational Epidemiology We used survival analysis to compare mortality rates between Camp Lejeune and Camp Pendleton. Data from 17 studies (with participants) were used in a meta-analysis, showing that men with high level occupational physical activity had an 18% increased risk of early mortality .